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The Concept Of Electric Car

unduhan-15The future of luxury cars isn’t all about flashy vehicles that drive themselves — at least that’s what Mercedes and Maybach want the super-rich to believe.

The Daimler-owned company unveiled a new electric-car concept, the Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6, on Aug. 19. The “6” actually represents how many meters long this car is, just shy of 20 feet — which is a pretty standard size for speedboats, if not sports cars. Mercedes showed off the concept in a bright shade of red, but if it repainted the Vision in black, it probably would not look out of place in a mid-1990s Batman feature.

CNBC: After Solar Impulse Flight, Solar Power Getting Its Day in the Sun

By helping to propel an airplane around the world recently, solar power took what some would consider a quantum leap into the future — one that includes less use of fossil fuels.

The flight of Solar Impulse 2, which this week completed a 25,000-mile journey across Europe, Asia and North America, captured the public’s imagination and raised a tantalizing question that has

Vehicle Program Is Struggling

unduhan-16The world’s largest automaker has so far sold about 270 hydrogen fuel cell cars in the state, where it delivered nearly 400,000 gas-powered vehicles last year, according to an Edmunds.com analysis of IHS Markit data. Toyota does not currently sell an electric vehicle.

And yet the automaker will have no trouble meeting California’s zero-emission vehicle mandates — because it can satisfy those obligations with state-awarded environmental credits instead of current zero-emission vehicle sales.

ETEnergyworld: Government Revokes India’s Coal Target

The government’s plan to push Coal India Ltd. to produce 1 billion tons of coal by 2020 has taken a back seat as officials now think the Indian economy is not yet equipped to consume the quantity — and huge unsold stocks are testimony to it. Now the company has been asked to produce to match demand.

“Risk, reliability & recovery” – An ABB Automation & Power World Digital Conference

This is likely to mean that Coal India will have to be content with producing less than the initial targets set

Future of Transportation

unduhan-14As the world awaits Elon Musk’s master plan for Tesla, we provide a glimpse into America’s master plan for transportation on this week’s podcast.

Reuben Sarkar, the deputy assistant secretary for transportation at the Department of Energy, joins us to talk electric cars, natural gas cars, autonomous cars, car efficiency and how the public sector can make automotive innovation easier in the private sector. We ask him: How optimistic should we really be about what all the changes underway in the sector?

In the second half of the show, we’ll discuss the end of nuclear power in California. We’ll also ask about Sungevity’s novel approach to going public — a worrying sign, or a clever way to raise money?

In December 2014, energy giant NextEra Energy offered to acquire Hawaiian Electric Industries in a transaction valued at $4.3 billion, which includes the assumption of $1.7 billion in HEI debt. HEI shareholders would receive a premium of approximately 21 percent on the share price. Citigroup Global Markets was the financial advisor to NextEra Energy. J.P. Morgan Securities advised HEI.

NextEra owns

Invests in Renewables of Rockefeller

The Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the foundation divesting from the fossil-fuel industry it helped create, took its first direct stake in a renewable energy company in a move meant to bolster the fight against climate change.

The New York City-based fund, founded in 1940 with the profits of Standard Oil Co., provided $10 million to Mainstream Renewable Power Ltd. to expand renewable energy in Africa. The investment was part of a $117.5 million funding round announced last month that included International Finance Corp. and other backers. The investment will help finance as much as $1.9 billion for green energy on the continent.

Utility Dive: Headed for the Exits, Nevada PUC Commissioner David Noble Lifts Lid on Net Metering Fight

At the end of last year, the epicenter of solar net metering battles shifted to Nevada, where regulators reduced incentives and imposed new fees for rooftop solar owners in the state.

The Dec. 22 decision, upheld by regulators in later votes, set off a firestorm of criticism at the Nevada Public Utilities Commission. Solar owners protested the regulatory body, saying the lower rates violated contracts they had previously signed with installers, and a group filed

The Embodied Energy in Tesla’s Gigafactory

Much has been made of the use of solar power at what is to become the largest factory in the world, the Tesla Gigafactory near Reno, Nevada, which will produce battery packs for cars and other applications. The “end-to-end” vision of using renewable energy sources to generate electricity for product manufacture and use is compelling, and one that has been forcefully made by Elon Musk. At an estimated cost of $5 billion (including $1.3 billion in tax incentives) and with factory floor-space intended to grow to some 1.2 million square meters by 2020, on 4 square kilometers of land, it is a monumental project.

Look beyond the hype, however, and there are major environmental questions that need to be answered, as the rhetoric and reality of green production are very different.

Fortune: Tesla Is Speeding Up Construction at Its Gigafactory

Tesla is working hard to finish construction on its Gigafactory by early 2017, slashing years off of its original timeline.

The company announced the launch of its Model 3 sedan in March, and Tesla wants the Gigafactory to be ready early enough to keep up with the high demand for the vehicle,The Wall Street

Elon Musk’s New Master Plan

“While doing above, also provide zero emission electric power generation options,” Musk wrote, almost as an afterthought. “Don’t tell anyone.”

The gist of his “Master Plan, Part Deux”: Save the planet. He just didn’t mention how.

Musk stated that “we must at some point achieve a sustainable energy economy or we will run out of fossil fuels to burn and civilization will collapse,” and then went on to list four primary ways that Tesla plans to promote sustainability:

  • Create “stunning” and seamlessly integrated solar-plus-battery-storage products.
  • Expand Tesla’s electric-vehicle product line to address all major segments — this includes the Model 3, a future compact SUV, and a new kind of pickup truck, as well as a heavy-duty truck and high-passenger-density urban transport.
  • Develop a self-driving capability that is 10 times safer than the U.S. vehicle average “via massive fleet learning.” And as the technology matures, Tesla vehicles will have the necessary equipment “to be fully self-driving with fail-operational capability, meaning that any given system in the car could break and your car will still drive itself safely.”
  • Self-driving Tesla vehicles will be enabled for car-sharing so they can make money for their owners when the owners aren’t

Commercial Autonomous Car

In the race to develop driverless cars, several automakers and technology companies are already testing vehicles that pilot themselves on public roads. And others have outlined plans to expand their development fleets over the next few years.

But few have gone so far as to give a definitive date for the commercial debut of these cars of the future.

Now Ford Motor has done just that.

At a news conference on Tuesday at the company’s research center in Palo Alto, Calif., Mark Fields, Ford’s chief executive, said the company planned to mass produce driverless cars and have them in commercial operation in a ride-hailing service by 2021.

Eliminating $4 billion of petroleum subsidies in the U.S. would have only a minor affect on oil production and demand and boost the country’s influence in advocating global climate change action, according to a report for the Council on Foreign Relations.

Withdrawing oil-drilling subsidies could cut domestic production by 5 percent by 2030, which could increase international oil prices by just 1 percent, Gilbert Metcalf, a professor of economics at Tufts University, said in the report. Local natural-gas prices

Mainstream Adoption

According to market tracker EV Volumes, 180,500 electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) were sold in the first four months of this year, a 42 percent increase over 2015 levels.

Those sales figures were lower than the second half of 2015, but EV Volumes noted demand for EVs and PHEVs spiked in November and December last year as certain incentives came to an end in China, Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden.

The 2016 Global EV Outlook from the International Energy Agency (IEA) also said last year was a pivotal one for EV and PHEV sales. “The year 2015 saw the global threshold of 1 million electric cars on the road exceeded, closing at 1.26 million,” said the organization.

“This is a symbolic achievement highlighting significant efforts deployed jointly by governments and industry over the past 10 years. In 2014, only about half of today’s electric car stock existed. In 2005, electric cars were still measured in hundreds.”

Just as significantly, another report by the IEA noted that electric vehicles were the only class of carbon-reduction technology making enough progress to meet global goals to keep global warming below the level of

Regulators for Years

Senior executives at Volkswagen AG, including its former chief executive, covered up evidence that the German automaker had cheated on U.S. diesel emissions tests for years, three U.S. states charged on Tuesday in civil lawsuits against the company.

New York, Massachusetts and Maryland filed separate, nearly identical lawsuits in state courts, accusing the world’s No. 2 automaker of violating their environmental laws. The lawsuits, which could lead to state fines of hundreds of millions of dollars or more, complicate VW’s efforts to move past the “Dieselgate” scandal that has hurt its business and reputation, and already cost it billions of dollars.

Automotive News: Audi Plans Electric Car Push to Put Heat on Tesla

Audi will aim for electric cars to account for a quarter of its sales by 2025 as part of a strategic overhaul following the emissions scandal at parent Volkswagen Group, company sources said, in a move that could step up the challenge to Tesla Motors.

Audi, which has been slow to embrace battery-powered vehicles, will now invest about a third of its research and development budget into electric cars, digital services, and autonomous driving, two company sources told Reuters.

Autonomy Is Coming Sooner Than Anyone Expects

So, despite missing its Q2 earnings and other targets, as related in a letter released late last week (misses that might have toppled a lesser stock), Tesla’s stock price barely wavered, and in fact seems to have risen upon the bad news. Some analysts have suggested that Tesla stock now trades solely on the success (or failure) of the Model 3. Tesla claims to “have completed the design phase of Model 3 and released Model 3 for tooling, production planning and validation.”

Here are the quarterly details.

  • Tesla had a larger-than-expected second-quarter loss of $1.06 per share — while the Street looked for a net loss of 59 cents a share
  • Non-GAAP sales were $1.56 billion, up from last year’s Q2 revenue of $1.2 billion, but below analyst expectations of $1.63 billion
  • Automotive gross margin expanded, but missed consensus estimates
  • Tesla delivered 14,402 cars (9,764 units of Model S and 4,638 units of Model X) in Q2 and looks to “support 50,000 deliveries” during the second half of 2016
  • According to the letter, “We ended up with $3.25 billion on the balance sheet at the end of the quarter. […] On December 31, 2015, we had $1.2 billion. We

New Regenerative Energy Technology

In the race to develop driverless cars, several automakers and technology companies are already testing vehicles that pilot themselves on public roads. And others have outlined plans to expand their development fleets over the next few years.

But few have gone so far as to give a definitive date for the commercial debut of these cars of the future.

Now Ford Motor has done just that.

At a news conference on Tuesday at the company’s research center in Palo Alto, Calif., Mark Fields, Ford’s chief executive, said the company planned to mass produce driverless cars and have them in commercial operation in a ride-hailing service by 2021.

Eliminating $4 billion of petroleum subsidies in the U.S. would have only a minor affect on oil production and demand and boost the country’s influence in advocating global climate change action, according to a report for the Council on Foreign Relations.

Withdrawing oil-drilling subsidies could cut domestic production by 5 percent by 2030, which could increase international oil prices by just 1 percent, Gilbert Metcalf, a professor of economics at Tufts University, said in the report. Local natural-gas prices

Energy Storage Would Be Needed

A new study from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory attempts to quantify the answer. The authors model several scenarios in which the California grid generates 50 percent of its power from solar by 2030. To do so will require some pretty major changes, including more flexible baseload generation, as well as more deployment of electric vehicles, exports to other states and demand response.

Those can only go so far, though. To meet the 50 percent photovoltaic threshold economically will require energy storage. The state already has 3,100 megawatts of pumped storage, with 1,325 megawatts of additional storage set to be deployed by 2020, per the state mandate. Under the most optimistic flexible grid scenario and with PV prices falling rapidly to 3 cents per kilowatt-hour, California will need another 15 gigawatts of storage by 2030.

That’s more than 11 times the amount mandated currently in California, and 66 times the total megawatts deployed in the U.S. last year. And any delays in the price declines of solar, or the rollout of EVs, or the flexibility of conventional power plants, will raise the bar on the amount of storage required.

That sounds daunting, admitted NREL

Why The Hybrid Car Motor in Order to Avoid Procuring Rare Earth Metals From China

The quest to find an alternative to heavy rare-earth elements in magnet manufacturing came after a 2010 dispute, during which China temporarily banned exports of rare-earth minerals. Even before that, however, Honda had been working to reduce the use of the materials in its manufacturing, as China began cutting back export quotas starting in 2006.

The motor is not completely without rare-earth elements. It still uses the light rare-earth element neodymium. But neodymium can be sourced from countries other than just China.

Carmakers use neodymium magnets because they have the highest magnetic force of any magnet. Demand for these magnets is expected to soar in coming years as more consumers buy all-electric and hybrid vehicles.

Magnet manufacturers usually add heavy rare-earth metals such as dysprosium or terbium in order for the magnet to have the high heat-resistance properties needed to operate in a car motor. But the reliance on these elements adds price volatility and supply chain uncertainty, especially when they can only be sourced from one location.

Research firm Technavio estimates that the rare-earth metals market will grow at 14 percent annually and will be worth more than $9 billion by 2019.

Car Companies

Any curbs would be aimed at weeding out the weak, said a senior executive with the state-backed auto manufacturers’ association, and they may push as many as 90 percent of EV startups toward extinction, a government-linked newspaper said. So far, only two ventures have obtained approval to build cars, based on a review of National Development and Reform Commission documents. Three others say they plan to apply for permits.

Vox: California Is About to Find Out What a Truly Radical Climate Policy Looks Like

Within the United States, California is No. 1 (by far) in solar power and No. 3 in wind power. It boasts the third-lowest carbon dioxide emissions per capita behind New York and Vermont. Since 2000, the state has managed to shrink its overall carbon footprint slightly even as its population grew and economy boomed.

But now California is taking on a far, far more audacious task: trying to prove to the world that it’s possible — desirable, even — to pursue the really drastic emission cuts needed to stave off severe global warming

The state is already on track to nudge its greenhouse-gas

Thriving Second Life EV Battery Market

As electric vehicles proliferate, so too will used EV batteries. Car companies and researchers are hustling to figure out how to safely adapt and reuse those depleted batteries when that time comes.

The basic pitch is simple enough: cars demand very high performance from their batteries, so once the battery’s capacity declines past a certain point 70 percent or 80 percent, depending on who you talk to it needs to be swapped out. At that point, though, the battery can still handle a lot of charge and discharge, making it useful for storage in less intensive stationary settings.

The sheer expense of developing and building those batteries in the first place makes a compelling case for capturing some additional value after their initial use. Second-life applications also delay the need to dispose of these resource-intensive products, which nobody has yet figured out how to do economically. If storage vendors can resell used batteries as a cheaper alternative to new storage, they could help more people consume their own rooftop solar generation, or reduce their peak demand, or any number of other uses that would advance the progress of a low-carbon grid.

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